NeCon News, or, A Glimpse into the Future

Now that Christopher Golden has shared the information on Facebook, I’m assuming it’s okay to reveal:  next year, I’ll be one of the writer guests of honor at the 39th NeCon, along with the fabulous Megan Abbott and the shiny Grady Hendrix!  Thomas Tessier is rightfully being recognized as the NeCon Legend, and the official convention Toastmaster is Kristin Dearborn.  Since I chummed him along to NeCon 37, Laird Barron has agreed to accompany me next summer, and Paul Tremblay is threatening to put in an appearance, as well.  This is in addition to the brilliant folks who regularly attend the con.

I have to admit, I’m thrilled at this honor.  To be appearing on the same guest of honor list as both Megan Abbott and Tom Tessier is a pretty heady thing.  I’ve had the pleasure of watching Grady Hendrix do several of his lecture/performances, and they are not to be missed.  My previous NeCon was among my best ever convention experiences, in no small part because of the relaxed atmosphere and deep sense of camaraderie among the attendees.  Finances prevented me from returning this year; I can’t wait to be back next summer.  Thanks to the NeCon folks for picking me.

Necon 38 Campers List

NeCon Schedule

This weekend, I’ll be attending my very first NeCon.  If you happen to be there, here’s what the powers-that-be have me signed up to do:

 

Friday, July 21st

2:00 p.m.  Who Are You Calling Weird?: Weird Fiction in the New Century
Laird Barron, John Langan, Sandra Kasturi, Jack Haringa (M), Bob Boyczuk, Douglas Wynne
The more things change, the more they stay weird! Weird fiction dates back to the late 19th century, and the real world is a far different place now than when the subgenre began. So, just what’s “weird” in 2017?

 

Saturday, July 22nd

4:30 p.m.  Greater Than the Sum: Collections, Linked and Otherwise
Elizabeth Massie (M), John Langan, Ed Kurtz, John Urbancik, Matt Bechtel, Laird Barron
The art of writing short fiction is obviously far different than that of writing a novel. That said, putting together a collection is also far different than writing any one tale. And what about when the stories are linked by a common setting or overlapping characters? Our panelists discuss the Jenga-like process of constructing a single-author collection.

 

I’m very much looking forward to this; if you’re there, please say hello.