Lovecraft ezine!

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of participating in the Lovecraft ezine’s weekly pod- and videocast, as the kickoff event for the launch of Sefira and Other Betrayals.  As ever, I had a blast talking with Mike Davis and the other participants who were kind enough to give up a couple of hours of their Sunday afternoons and evenings to be there.  Here’s a link to the videocast, if you’re so inclined.  Our conversation embraced such topics as who will win in the inevitable fight among myself, Laird Barron, and Paul Tremblay; whom you should lay you money on in a battle between Godzilla and Cthulhu; and what Godzilla would sound like with a French accent.

Barron vs. Tremblay, or Godzilla vs. Cthulhu? (Painting by the ever-brilliant Bob Eggleton; buy a poster of the image here).

 

During the show, I mentioned a number of novels, collections, and journals that are worth a look.  I wanted to link to as many of them as I can remember, so here you go:

Dan Chaon  Ill Will

Glen Hirshberg  Nothing to Devour (also Motherless Child and Good Girls).

Laird Barron  Black Mountain

Nathan Ballingrud  Wounds

Carrie Laben  A Hawk in the Woods

A.C. Wise  Catfish Lullaby

Navin Weeraratme  Zeelam

S.P. Miskowski  The Worst is Yet to Come

Molly Tanzer  Creatures of Will and Temper (and Creatures of Want and Ruin)

Paul Tremblay  Growing Things

Vastarien

Thinking Horror Vol. 2

Robert Wilson  Ashes and Entropy

Ellen Datlow  Echoes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Couple of Happy Updates, Plus! Boskone

I’m delighted to report that the Russian translation of The Fisherman has won an award for best translated novel of the year at the “Most Terrible Festival” in St. Petersburg.  Bozhe moi!  Thanks very much to AST publishing, who brought out the novel in Russia, to Grigory Shokin, who translated it, and to everyone responsible for the book receiving its (and my) first non-English language award!

The Fisherman–Russian edition

In related news, I’ve done an interview with the Russian webzine, Darker, in which we talk about The Fisherman and my love for Russian literature.

I’m also delighted to report that my story, “Haak,” which first appeared in Mark Morris’s splendid New Fears 2 anthology has been selected by Ellen Datlow for inclusion in the eleventh volume of her “Best Horror of the Year” series, alongside some fabulous work.  I’m particularly pleased that this story, written for the inestimable Jack Haringa, continues to reach a wider audience.  Here’s the table of contents:

I Remember Nothing by Anne Billson
Monkeys on the Beach by Ralph Robert Moore
Painted Wolves by Ray Cluley
Shit Happens by Michael Marshall Smith
You Know How the Story Goes by Thomas Olde Heuvelt
Back Along the Old Track by Sam Hicks
Masks by Peter Sutton
The Donner Party by Dale Bailey
Milkteeth by Kristi DeMeester
Haak by John Langan
Thin Cold Hands by Gemma Files
A Tiny Mirror by Eloise C. C. Shepherd
I Love You Mary-Grace by Amelia Mangan
The Jaws of Ouroboros by Steve Toase
A Brief Moment of Rage by Bill Davidson
Golden Sun by Kristi DeMeester, Richard Thomas, Damien Angelica Walters, and Michael Wehunt
White Mare by Thana Niveau
Girls Without Their Faces On by Laird Barron
Thumbsucker by Robert Shearman
You Are Released by Joe Hill
Red Rain by Adam-Troy Castro
Split Chain Stitch by Steve Toase
No Exit by Orrin Grey
Haunt by Siobhan Carroll
Sleep by Carly Holmes

Finally, I had a brilliant time this past weekend at the 56th annual Boskone, held at the Westin hotel in Boston.  It’s always a pleasure to see such friends as Paul Tremblay, Jack Haringa, JoAnn Cox, Brett and Jeanne Cox, Nick Kaufmann and Alexa Antopol, Vicki Dalpe, Grady Hendrix, Liz Hand and John Clute, Bracken MacLeod, Errick Nunnally, Chris Golden, and Ellen Datlow, but beyond that, the con organizers have really made an effort to expand their horror-related programming, and to include horror writers on more general-topic panels.  In addition, they’re made a commitment to diversifying their participants that continues to yield results.  It’s made Boskone one of the can’t-miss conventions for me.  Thanks to all who worked so hard at putting it on this year, and to anyone who might be thinking about the convention for 2020, I’d encourage you to give it a try.

 

 

Summer 2018 Part 3: Quincy

The weekend of July 12-15 brought me back to Quincy, MA for Readercon 29.  With Boskone, Readercon is one of the conventions I try my darnedest not to miss, and it was great fun to re-connect with friends from Readercons past, as well as to meet new ones.  Probably the weirdest thing about the convention for me was the absence of several of my usual co-conspirators:  Laird Barron, Jack Haringa, and Paul Tremblay in particular.  But this was made up for by the chance to meet and spend time with a number of newer writers, from Nadia Bulkin to Teri Clarke to Mike Griffin to Gwendolyn Kiste to Farah Rose Smith to Justin Steele to Marcus Tsong to Brookelynne Warra.  Not to mention, more time with the terrific Alexa Antopol, Matt Bartlett, Brett Cox, JoAnn Cox, Ellen Datlow, Gemma Files, Karen Heuler, Nick Kaufmann, Veronica Schanoes, and Chandler Klang Smith and Eric, her pet halibut.  Oh, and who could forget Michael Cisco literally stepping out of an angle, cup of coffee in hand?  (Not me, no matter how hard I might try.)

Highlights of the convention included my Thursday night reading, which was smack-dab in the middle of a sequence beginning with Karen Heuler, continuing to me, then moving on to Brett Cox and finishing with Scott Edelman.

Image may contain: 1 person, sitting and indoor

(photo courtesy of Michael Griffin)

Despite the opening-night-scheduling, there was a substantial audience in attendance, as there was for my coffee-klatch the next day.  I had the great good fortune there to sit at a table with a number of up-and-comers, from Teri Clarke to Stephen Mazur to Marcus Tsong, and to engage in conversation that I found fascinating and rewarding.  Also on Friday, I participated in two scheduled panels, one each on Seabury Quinn and E.S. Nesbit.  (On Sunday, I also took part in a panel to which I was added later-than-last-minute, on endings in horror fiction, and  managed to try the collective patience of my fellow-panelists by complaining at length about the idea that horror narratives are supposed to impart some kind of lesson or moral to their audience.  Oy:  sorry about that, folks.)  Saturday took me to Tony’s Clam Shop, there to be interviewed by Scott Edelman for his Eating the Fantastic podcast.  (Which, I have to admit, was a bucket-list item of mine.)  The only other scheduled event I took part in was Sunday’s Shirley Jackson awards, where my introductory duties included the sad task of briefly memorializing both Kit Reed and Jack Ketchum, friends to the award and fine writers both.  Possibly the highlight of the award ceremony was Michael Kelly’s emotional win in the anthology category.

A good part of the weekend consisted of meals and conversations with various groups of people, a couple of them held at the Royal Hot Pot restaurant, which I highly recommend.  Chandler Klang Smith is frighteningly smart, and we had a brief but appreciative discussion of Dan Chaon’s Ill Will.  I also had the opportunity to listen to Nadia Bulkin discussing Michael Cisco’s theory of weird fiction with him, while I nodded sagely and acted as if I was keeping up with them.  Phil Gelatt and Vicki Dalpe attended their first Readercon, and solidified my judgement that Vicki is one of the funniest people, ever; but I also got to listen to Vicki discussing Experimental Film with Gemma Files, particularly its treatment of motherhood, and to hear Gemma talk about what she’s working on for her follow-up novel.

Image may contain: 9 people, including Brett Cox and Matthew M. Bartlett, people smiling, people sitting, table and indoor

Royal Hotpot!

(photo courtesy of Nick Kaufmann)

Once the con was done, I drove Michael Cisco and Farah Rose Smith to the train station in Beacon, enjoying the usual blend of intelligence and sheer ridiculousness I’ve come to expect from him on these yearly jaunts.  Cisco also came up with a story that I am not at liberty to speak about, but that I expect will be appearing soon.  Indeed, I would bet my ass on it.

 

Upcoming Events

Well, David and I survived our black belt test this past weekend; now we just have to wait for the results, which should arrive at the end of the month.  The test was long (almost seven hours, from start to finish), but we were prepared for it, so I’m feeling reasonably optimistic.

In the meantime, here are a few events I’ll be part of during the next month or so.

 

October 16, 5-7pm

Children of Lovecraft reading:

The Lovecraft Bar NYC

50 Avenue B, New York, New York 10009

This celebration of Ellen Datlow’s latest anthology will feature readings by several of its contributors, including Livia Llewellyn, Laird Barron, Siobhan Carroll, Maria Dahvana Headley, Richard Kadrey, John Langan, David Nickle, and A.C. Wise.

children-of-lovecraft-cover

 

October 22, 10am-4pm

Merrimack Valley Halloween Book Festival 2016

Haverhill Public Library

99 Main St., Haverhill, MA

Join us as we celebrate books this Halloween season! 36 Authors and Artists gather to present panel discussions on New England horror traditions, ghost stories, why scary stories are good for kids, and much more! Authors will be selling and autographing their books. This event is sponsored by River City Writers and Jabberwocky Bookshop!

You can find a list of the writers attending and some of what we’ll be doing here.

merrimack-2016

 

October 28, 9pm-12am

Oh, the Horror! A Spooky Salon with Stories & Music
Be Electric Studios

1298 Willoughby Ave, Brooklyn, New York 11237
A brilliant and thrilling evening of ghosts, monsters, and other-worldly visitors, curated by DANIEL BRAUM, who is the author of The Night Marchers and Other Strange Tales (Cemetery Dance 2016). Mr. Braum will be reading alongside JOHN LANGAN, CHANDLER KLANG SMITH, and NICHOLAS KAUFMANN. Plus, the very talented JANNA PELLE will be our featured musician for the evening. Dress up in your most terrifying Halloween costumes, if you dare (totally optional)!
oh-the-horror-pic

November 16, 2016, 7-9pm

Fantastic Fiction at KGB
85 East 4th Street
I’ll be reading alongside the talented Matthew Kressel.
kgb-barnight
There are a couple of more things I think I’ll be doing; I’ll post a separate entry for them once I have the details ironed out.

Corpsemouth!

One of the true pleasures of this past weekend’s HPLFF was getting to meet Dave Felton, an extremely talented artist who gifted me with the astonishing drawing he did for a scene from my story, “Corpsemouth” (which appeared in Ellen Datlow’s The Monstrous).  I had filmed a short video of myself reading an excerpt from the story for Jordan Krall’s most recent Krall-con; the idea was that, as I was reading the piece, Dave would be working on a drawing inspired by what he was hearing.  According to him, after the con, he went back to his drawing board to come up with a version of the drawing that was more in keeping with what he had in mind.  I was delighted with what he produced:

Corpsemouth by Dave Felton

Isn’t it something?  I tell you, every time I look at this, I grin like a kid.

Needless to say, Dave Felton has talent to spare.  Here’s a link to his Eldritch Etchings Tumblr site.  I hope he’ll start doing prints of his work; I also look forward to seeing more of it.  This guy needs to be illustrating a lot more of the weird stuff that’s being done now.

Here’s Me Reading a Brief Excerpt from “Corpsemouth”

A few months ago, Jordan Krall contacted me to ask if I would be interested in providing a recording of me reading from one of my stories for one of the activities scheduled at his annual KrallCon.  (Which sounds vague and possibly sinister, I know.)  The other night, my older son, Nick, stayed up late with me to record this excerpt from my story, “Corpsemouth,” which first appeared in Ellen Datlow’s anthology, The Monstrous.  I thought it would be fun to share it with anyone who’s interested.

 

 

Nightmares: A New Decade of Modern Horror

I think you have to file this one under bucket-list items you didn’t realize were on your bucket-list:  my story, “The Shallows,” from Darrell Schweitzer’s Cthulhu’s Reign a few years back, will be appearing in Ellen Datlow’s forthcoming survey of recent horror fiction, Nightmares: A New Decade of Modern Horror, which will be out from Tachyon later this year.

NightmaresCover

Some cover, huh?

The table of contents for this book is humbling:

 

  • Shallaballah by Mark Samuels
  • Sob in the Silence by Gene Wolfe
  • Our Turn Too Will One Day Come by Brian Hodge
  • Dead Sea Fruit by Kaaron Warren
  • Closet Dreams by Lisa Tuttle
  • Spectral Evidence by Gemma Files
  • Hushabye by Simon Bestwick
  • Very Low-Flying Aircraft by Nicholas Royle
  • The Goosle by Margo Lanagan
  • The Clay Party by Steve Duffy
  • Strappado by Laird Barron
  • Lonegan’s Luck by Stephen Graham Jones
  • Mr Pigsny by Reggie Oliver
  • At Night, When the Demons Come by Ray Cluley
  • Was She Wicked? Was She Good? by M. Rickert
  • The Shallows by John Langan
  • Little Pig by Anna Taborska
  • Omphalos by Livia Llewellyn
  • How We Escaped Our Certain Fate by Dan Chaon
  • That Tiny Flutter of the Heart I Used to Call Love by Robert Shearman
  • Interstate Love Song (Murder Ballad No. 8) by Caitlín R. Kiernan
  • Shay Corsham Worsted by Garth Nix
  • The Atlas of Hell by Nathan Ballingrud
  • Ambitious Boys Like You by Richard Kadrey

Thanks so much to Ellen Datlow for including me in this, and congratulations to everyone else in the book.