Interviews!

Lately, I’ve had the pleasure of being interviewed for several podcasts, the first couple of which have been posted.  If you have a little time, perhaps you’d like to listen to them.

First up, I talk to the Humming Fools (their name, not mine).  The focus of their podcast is on creativity, which they approach in a very funny way.  They’re also in the process of creating a horror comic based on fictional versions of themselves (at least, I assume they’re fictional).  The first two issues are up on their site, and I have to tell you, I enjoyed the heck out of them, and was sorry the third wasn’t done yet.

HF_Cover_Ep.58_JohnLangan

This is the image the Fools (specifically, Noah Baslé) came up with for my show with them.  Holy cow, do I love this, and wish it were on a t-shirt.  Or a huge poster.  Or painted on my house.  Good job, Noah!

Second is a conversation with Curtis Lawson for his Wyrd Transmissions podcast.  Curtis is the author of a very cool novel, Black Heart Boys’ Choir, and we had a terrific conversation about writing horror fiction.

WyrdTransmissionsLogo

This the logo for Curtis’s podcast.  It’s nice to see that monsters love to read, too.

 

Children of the Fang!

My goodness, it’s been a while since I visited this space, hasn’t it?  Sorry for all the dust, but I’ll probably let the spiders stay.

Here’s some good news to start:  this August, my fourth collection of stories, Children of the Fang and Other Genealogies, will be published by Word Horde Press!  Here’s a look at the beautiful cover the brilliant Matthew Jaffe came up with for it:

cfog_cover_sm-518x800

Klimt meets Frazetta!

Stephen Graham Jones provided a very kind and generous introduction that made me feel I was a much smarter writer than I am.

This is a big book,  modeled after collections like King’s Skeleton Crew and Barker’s Books of Blood.  Here’s the Table of Contents:

Sweetums” 

Hyphae”

Muse” 

Zombies in Marysville” 

With Max Barry in the Nearer Precincts” 

Into the Darkness, Fearlessly” 

Children of the Fang” 

Episode Three: On the Great Plains, in the Snow” 

Tragōidia” 

Ymir” 

Irezumi” 

The Horn of the World’s Ending” 

The Underground Economy” 

The Communion of Saints” 

Aphanisis” 

Gripped” 

Inundation” 

To See, To Be Seen” 

What You Do Not Bring Forth” 

Vista” 

Slippage” 

If you’d like to preorder a copy from Word Horde, it would be much appreciated.  As we did with The Fisherman, I’ll be signing (and illustrating!) bookplates for the Word Horde orders.

Lovecraft eZine Part Deux: With Laird Barron and Paul Tremblay

It’s time for another of my sporadic efforts to update ye olde blog.  Let’s begin with a link to another visit I had to the Lovecraft eZine podcast just a couple of months after I’d been on to promote the release of Sefira and Other Betrayals.  This time, it was to take part in a round table discussion with the Honey Badger and the Pickle King.  I had a blast, and if we’re no closer to answering the question of who would win a fight among the three of us (hint:  it’s neither of them), the podcast is a good reminder why Laird and Paul are two of my favorite people.  Seriously, I love these guys.

 

Lovecraft ezine!

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of participating in the Lovecraft ezine’s weekly pod- and videocast, as the kickoff event for the launch of Sefira and Other Betrayals.  As ever, I had a blast talking with Mike Davis and the other participants who were kind enough to give up a couple of hours of their Sunday afternoons and evenings to be there.  Here’s a link to the videocast, if you’re so inclined.  Our conversation embraced such topics as who will win in the inevitable fight among myself, Laird Barron, and Paul Tremblay; whom you should lay you money on in a battle between Godzilla and Cthulhu; and what Godzilla would sound like with a French accent.

Barron vs. Tremblay, or Godzilla vs. Cthulhu? (Painting by the ever-brilliant Bob Eggleton; buy a poster of the image here).

 

During the show, I mentioned a number of novels, collections, and journals that are worth a look.  I wanted to link to as many of them as I can remember, so here you go:

Dan Chaon  Ill Will

Glen Hirshberg  Nothing to Devour (also Motherless Child and Good Girls).

Laird Barron  Black Mountain

Nathan Ballingrud  Wounds

Carrie Laben  A Hawk in the Woods

A.C. Wise  Catfish Lullaby

Navin Weeraratme  Zeelam

S.P. Miskowski  The Worst is Yet to Come

Molly Tanzer  Creatures of Will and Temper (and Creatures of Want and Ruin)

Paul Tremblay  Growing Things

Vastarien

Thinking Horror Vol. 2

Robert Wilson  Ashes and Entropy

Ellen Datlow  Echoes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sefira& Other Betrayals!

Today is the official release day for my third collection, Sefira and Other Betrayals (which is available in paperback from Amazon here and in hardcover and paperback from the publisher, Hippocampus press, here).  Although I’ve been planning it for some time, this one took a while to arrive, in no small part because what was supposed to be the original, title story turned into an actual short novel in the writing, and then the other original story I decided had to be in it became a novella.  Thanks to everyone who’s been waiting for the book for your patience.

If you don’t mind, I’d like to include the book’s Acknowledgments page here, because you can never say thank you enough times for the good things in your life.  (I know, some of this is redundant, but what the heck?):

Acknowledgments

With this latest book of stories, I am reminded once again of my debt to my lovely wife, Fiona, for her love, support, and patience.  Thanks, Love, for all of it; here’s another bouquet of dark flowers.
The love and support of my sons, Nick and David, is a constant and ever-surprising joy. Thanks, guys; I look forward eagerly to the art you’re making.
Laird Barron and Paul Tremblay remain the brothers I never knew I had, their regular phone conversations one of the highlights of my week. They continue to do amazing work, which inspires me to try to do better in my own fiction. Nadia Bulkin, Michael Cisco, GlenHirshberg, Stephen Graham Jones, Sarah Langan, and S.P. Miskowski arepretty cool, too.
I continue to consider myself fortunate in my agent, the indefatigable Ginger Clark, as well as her assistant, Tess, and the film and foreign rights folks at Curtis, Brown. As the story notes indicate, I owe most of these pieces to invitations from editors, and I’m grateful for the support John Joseph Adams, Ellen Datlow, Nick Gevers and Jack Dann, and S.T. Joshi showed these stories by first publishing them. Thanks, too, to Derrick Hussey and Hippocampus Press for the fine work they did with my last collection, and for publishing this one.
Finally, thanks to you, whoever you are, for the gift of your time and attention (and in many cases, patience—I know this book has been a long time coming). You make books such as this one possible, and I’m grateful for that.

 

 

Also:  that Santiago Caruso:  am I right, or what?

A Couple of Happy Updates, Plus! Boskone

I’m delighted to report that the Russian translation of The Fisherman has won an award for best translated novel of the year at the “Most Terrible Festival” in St. Petersburg.  Bozhe moi!  Thanks very much to AST publishing, who brought out the novel in Russia, to Grigory Shokin, who translated it, and to everyone responsible for the book receiving its (and my) first non-English language award!

The Fisherman–Russian edition

In related news, I’ve done an interview with the Russian webzine, Darker, in which we talk about The Fisherman and my love for Russian literature.

I’m also delighted to report that my story, “Haak,” which first appeared in Mark Morris’s splendid New Fears 2 anthology has been selected by Ellen Datlow for inclusion in the eleventh volume of her “Best Horror of the Year” series, alongside some fabulous work.  I’m particularly pleased that this story, written for the inestimable Jack Haringa, continues to reach a wider audience.  Here’s the table of contents:

I Remember Nothing by Anne Billson
Monkeys on the Beach by Ralph Robert Moore
Painted Wolves by Ray Cluley
Shit Happens by Michael Marshall Smith
You Know How the Story Goes by Thomas Olde Heuvelt
Back Along the Old Track by Sam Hicks
Masks by Peter Sutton
The Donner Party by Dale Bailey
Milkteeth by Kristi DeMeester
Haak by John Langan
Thin Cold Hands by Gemma Files
A Tiny Mirror by Eloise C. C. Shepherd
I Love You Mary-Grace by Amelia Mangan
The Jaws of Ouroboros by Steve Toase
A Brief Moment of Rage by Bill Davidson
Golden Sun by Kristi DeMeester, Richard Thomas, Damien Angelica Walters, and Michael Wehunt
White Mare by Thana Niveau
Girls Without Their Faces On by Laird Barron
Thumbsucker by Robert Shearman
You Are Released by Joe Hill
Red Rain by Adam-Troy Castro
Split Chain Stitch by Steve Toase
No Exit by Orrin Grey
Haunt by Siobhan Carroll
Sleep by Carly Holmes

Finally, I had a brilliant time this past weekend at the 56th annual Boskone, held at the Westin hotel in Boston.  It’s always a pleasure to see such friends as Paul Tremblay, Jack Haringa, JoAnn Cox, Brett and Jeanne Cox, Nick Kaufmann and Alexa Antopol, Vicki Dalpe, Grady Hendrix, Liz Hand and John Clute, Bracken MacLeod, Errick Nunnally, Chris Golden, and Ellen Datlow, but beyond that, the con organizers have really made an effort to expand their horror-related programming, and to include horror writers on more general-topic panels.  In addition, they’re made a commitment to diversifying their participants that continues to yield results.  It’s made Boskone one of the can’t-miss conventions for me.  Thanks to all who worked so hard at putting it on this year, and to anyone who might be thinking about the convention for 2020, I’d encourage you to give it a try.